Great Day Ministry


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“Great Day” Sunday 08/20/2017


Who are we? To whom do we belong? Who do we serve?
As we ponder our true identity perhaps we need a reminder that we are created in the “image and likeness of God”.
In his letter to the Ephesians the apostle Paul writes; “We are God’s workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.”
So how do we warrant such a high calling? Again the words of the apostle Paul;
“But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far away have been brought near through the blood of Christ.”
So let us carefully consider who we are, to whom we belong, and the ultimate cost of that relationship.
For Christians it’s time to pay it forward.

A recommended song to accompany this devotion is Remind Me Who I Am” by Jason Gray.
To hear the complete 3-minute program click > on the sound bar ABOVE, or contact  greatdayministry@aol.com and request that it to be sent to your e-mail daily.
Users of ANDROID Mobile Devices can download this program by holding on
Great Day 082017
and selecting ‘Save Link’.

“Great Day Presents” Week Of 08/20/2017- 08/26/2017


The Chapel Quotes

“There are four viruses that kill organizations, businesses, churches, ministries, teams and even families. They are resistance, silence, collusion, and cynicism. These viruses are used to attack leadership whether flawed or not. Satan is the author of these viruses.”

“Resistance is a virus. The Word of God reminds us that we come from a long line of resistors. The virus of resistance has been around since the very beginning and has the capacity to affect us. Resistant people refuse to listen, and follow the stubborn inclination of their evil hearts.”

“Silence is a virus.  By virtue of God’s Word and its design for us we don’t get to quit talking. We may need to talk better. We may need to be more God-honoring, but we don’t get to shut up and go home.”

“Collusion is a virus. It’s bad enough when just you and your bad attitude decide to resist or be silent, but now you are recruiting, now you’re getting others to join in to your sinful mindset and actions.”

“Cynicism is a virus. It’s being negative, critical and finding fault. It is powerful and carries with it all kinds of destructive capacity. This kind of mindset is not at all what God has designed for us. We are to encourage each other and build each other up.”

To access complete messages from The Chapel click http://www.thechapel.net to go to The Chapel website.

“Christian Stylings In Ivory” by composer-musician Don Krueger Week of 08/20/17

To hear the complete 15-minute program click > on the sound bar ABOVE.
Users of ANDROID Mobile Devices can download this program by holding on          
Stylings 082017 and selecting ‘Save Link’.

Devotion 08/20/2017
Our Devotion: “Hard Situations Soften Us” by Mandi Hall of Mount Prospect, Illinois, a 2017 summer professional writing student at Taylor University in Upland, Indiana.

As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today.”  Genesis 50:20

We’ve all met those people.  You know, folks whose words and actions leave carnage in their wake.  We think of these individuals as ones from whom “nothing good ever arises.” Years ago, a friend of mine fitted into this category. She exaggerated and lied constantly as a way of drawing attention to herself, and when caught she never admitted her own wrongdoings.  We had a painful falling out, and for a long time I wondered why God had allowed someone so negative to be part of my life.  But then I recalled how John Mark had been a disappointment to Paul, yet years later was restored and made useful to the cause of Christ. Knowing this, I continued to pray for my friend.  As time has passed and we’ve been separated by life’s transitions, I’ve not been privileged to know whether or not this former friend changed her ways and became more gracious to those around her. What I do know is, God used my interaction with her to teach me patience, forgiveness, and compassion. I discovered that God can use even our hardships to soften us.

PRAYER: Lord, help me understand that everything that happens is a part of your plan for good, even if I don’t see it in the moment; in Christ, I pray. Amen


Book Review 08/16/2017

This Book Review comes from Lillian G. Smith, a 2017 summer professional writing student at Taylor University.

Mattie’s Pledge
by Jan Drexel
Revell, PB, 377 pages

This story is set in 1843 in Brothers Valley, Pennsylvania. Mattie Schrock and her family are preparing for the journey of a lifetime.  They eagerly are awaiting the arrival of the rest of a group who will accompany them to a new Amish settlement in Indiana. As the newcomers show up, they include the handsome Jacob Yoder, Mattie’s childhood protector and friend. Jacob and Mattie have an immediate attraction to each other, but their dreams for the future lie on opposite spectrums. Jacob longs to settle down in Indiana and begin his family, whereas Mattie dreams of the mysteries and wonders of moving to the west.  Can Mattie and Jacob decide if their dreams are worth compromising for each other?  Complicating matters, a frightening but tempting Englisher flirts with Mattie throughout their journey, asking her to run away with him.  Mattie struggles to stay true to her Amish roots while also retaining her yearning to travel, explore, and discover new places and people.
Jan Drexler delivers a heartwarming story of excitement, love, and decision making. The page-turning novel leaves readers eager for a satisfying conclusion, and they are guaranteed to receive that. The compelling message of trusting God’s will is expertly woven into the pages and leaves readers with a desire to discover such leading in their own lives. Teens and young adults, especially women, will enjoy this story. Although this book does not have a blatantly Christian storyline, Christian themes of trusting in God and relying on his plans are obvious throughout the chapters.

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