Great Day Ministry

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“Great Day Presents” Week Of 08/28/2016-09/03/2016


“Great Day” Tuesday 08/30/2016
Ever notice how plants stretch toward the sun?
I’ve an indoor geranium that’s actually forced its way through the slats in the Venetian blinds just to catch those warm nurturing rays.
There’s a lesson for us here, to quote English author Samuel Johnson; “He that will enjoy the brightness of the sunshine, must quit the coolness of the shade.”
When our lives become overcast by the shadows of despair and discontent we need to vigorously head for the sunshine of God’s will.

A recommended song to accompany this devotion is “On The Sunny Side Of The Street” by Steve Tyrell.
If you would like to hear the complete 3-minute program click below, or contact greatdayministry@aol.com and request that it to be sent to your e-mail daily.


Rick Hawks’ Quotes
“The Lord is with us always. He is inescapable, and He is inseparable from us. God will never leave us. God is everywhere. There is no place we can hide. God has ordained our days.”

“God made us. God made us for His purpose. God will lead us with His wisdom. God’s wisdom is precious, infinite, incomprehensible, and self-revealing. It reveals to us who we are.”

“No matter what you accomplish, no matter how many people cheer at the sound of your name, no matter how many gold medals they hang around your neck, if you’re not aware that God has a purpose for you, nothing else will give it purpose.”

To access Pastor Rick Hawks’ complete messages click http://www.thechapel.net to go to The Chapel website.

Devotion 08/28/2016
Our Devotion: “Fishing for Coins” by Kristi Schweitzer, a professional writing major at Taylor University and freelance writer for WBCL radio, Christian Book Previews, Church Libraries, and The Aboite Independent.

Have you ever wondered why each of us has a different set of skills? You see it today, the same way it was evident back in Bible times. The men Jesus called as disciples were of a wide variety of professions. Paul was a tentmaker, Matthew a tax collector, Luke a doctor, and Peter a fisherman.
At the end of Matthew 17, Jesus instructed Peter to get money to pay for their taxes. In verse 27, Jesus told Peter, “So, go to the lake and fish. After you catch the first fish, open its mouth and you will find a coin. Take that coin and give it to the tax collectors for you and me.”
One might ask why Jesus needed to go through Peter to get the coin. Why didn’t he just miraculously pull a coin out of his pocket and give it to Peter? Jesus gave Peter a task that involved a skill Peter already had mastered. Jesus chose to work through Peter’s talents and training as a demonstration that, whatever we do, if we turn our service over to the Lord, he can use it to further his kingdom.
We all have special talents, and God will use them for His glory if we allow Him.

Book Review 08/242016
This Book Review comes from Sarah Sawicki, a professional writing major at Taylor University and book reviewer for Church Libraries and The Aboite Independent.

A LADY LIKE SARAH: A Rocky Creek Romance
By Margaret Brownley
Thomas Nelson Publishers, 978-1-59554-809-2, PB, 313 pages, $14.99

Margaret Brownley has struck gold with her western romance, A Lady Like Sarah. Pastor Justin Wells has been forced out of his New England church into the wilds of Texas. On his way he meets Sarah Prescott, an outlaw being led back to jail. As Justin attempts to change the hearts of the townspeople and prove Sarah’s innocence, he finds that his own faith and feelings toward God and Sarah change as well.
On occasion, Brownley puts theology in the back seat to further the romance, but overall, her book is well written, believable, and keeps the reader interested to the last page. Readers will relate to the major characters in a way that is not matched by most typical westerns, for the story examines themes of isolation, desperation, alienation, and inspiration. Outlaw Sarah Prescott will steal the hearts of readers everywhere.

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